Script writing

Screenwriting, also called script-writing is the art and craft of writing scripts for mass media such as feature films, television productions or video games.

123Screenwriters are responsible for researching the story, developing the narrative, writing the screenplay, and delivering it, in the required format, to Development Executives. Screenwriters therefore have great influence over the creative direction and emotional impact of the screenplay and, arguably, of the finished film. They either pitch original ideas to Producers in the hope that they will be optioned or sold, or screenwriters are commissioned by a producer to create a screenplay from a concept, true story, existing screen work or literary work, such as a novel, poem, play, comic book or short story.

The act of screenwriting takes many forms across the entertainment industry. Often, multiple writers work on the same script at different stages of development with different tasks.

 

Visual Design

The director works closely with the art director to develop concept art for all elements in the production. Working under the art director’s supervision, concept artists in the Visual Design department create multiple versions of these elements, which usually include characters, props, environments, and any asset that will need to be created during the production stage.

Visual designs are usually in the form of traditional sketches and paintings, as well as clay sculptures, often referred to as maquettes. These designs begin loosely and are refined over time, and turned into model sheets for the modeling and texture departments.

 

Developing a  Character

1. The KISS Principlekeep_it_simple

Keep it Simple, Stupid. As you’re not only going to have to build, but animate your character it pays not to go overboard on design. Try to keep your designs simple, elegant and above all workable.

 

2. Development

A strong main character is essential to an animated production. For your main character to be strong, you have to know them inside and out. This is where acting plays a huge part in animation. Think about things like:

  • How will your character react in any given situation?
  • How does your character move around?
  • How does your character interact with other characters and the environment around it?
  • What sort of character is it?
  • What are its goals and motivations?
  • What are the physical considerations you need to make? (Gravity, weight, mass, health, speed, height, weight etc)

 

Step 1:

Draw your way to fulfillment – the next step is rough character sketches, you should have some idea of your story from the brainstorming, and things to note here are that reference is always invaluable, the more reference you can get the better for you and your characters it will be. Get used to drawing your character and its parts over and over again, become familiar with the look and feel of your character, try different poses and actions. Make sure the character has a strong silhouette, a distinct solid black shape. This will make sure it can be seen over a background.

 

Step 2:

Start breathing some life – The aim in any animation should be the “Illusion of Life” you’re not just trying to make normally inanimate objects move, you’re attempting to bring them to life. You will need to make your character believable to your audience. As well as good, accurate motion, there are several other things you can give your character to help present the Illusion of Life